Thursday, July 11, 2019

Nuts about Fudge Covered Nutter Butters


In this modern day and age, there are a lot of things that are easy to take for granted. Between the constant stimulation from our smartphones, the constant need for validation on social media and a global world where news happens and is shared 24/7, 365 - it’s really easy to have high expectations when it comes to most things. Think about it, when’s the last time that you and all of your friends went out for plain vanilla ice cream? For me, that’s what happened to the Nutter Butter; a faithful friend from my childhood who never once disappointed me, lost somewhere up on the proverbial shelf to Frankenstein types of junk food, more outrageous than the last.

The good news for me? I have an awesome roommate; one who not only tolerates me, but who also surprises me on occasion with some of my favorite things and a few nights ago, it was no exception. Not only is Nutter Butter still churning out Old Faithful, but in keeping with the times, there is now a chocolate coated version. I love peanut butter, but 100 percent of the time, I will pick a dessert with peanut butter AND chocolate, so this is right up my alley.



Walking in after a long day to find a box of these cookies next to patriotic flowers, all I could think was God Bless America – the land where you can take a dessert and make it even more dessert-y. 



The box itself is vibrant, the picture calling me in. It’s amazing that two of these cookies are only 180 calories. Seems pretty reasonable as a dessert if you ask me.


Opening up the box, I was a little sad to see that there were only 12. I love to share, but this means that I would have six cookies, which isn’t a whole ton. Only thing left to do was to dig in and WOW, were these good!


If I had to compare the cookies to anything, it would be a less sweet version of Girl Scout Tagalongs, one of my favorite cookies of all time. 



The chocolate coating is thick and there is enough peanut butter in between that you could separate the cookie like it is an Oreo and enjoy two halves. 



The chocolate coating has a real texture to it, meaning it isn’t uniformly coated - in a good way, allowing for some bites to be heavier with the peanut butter and others with the chocolate.



The only negative to these cookies at all is that there are so few in the box. You can see in the tray that they need some space, probably to avoid melting and getting stuck together, but two is simply not enough to not want more. I’ll be buying these cookies again to be sure. Try them and you’re welcome!

Monday, June 17, 2019

Stamford Restaurant Chronicles: Pellicci's

Growing up Greenbaum, it wasn’t atypical for us to have pasta for dinner at least three times a week. As a kid, I remember eating so much pasta so often that as an adult I really don’t care for it much. For me, the carb laden meal is just a missed opportunity to eat the seafood or beef meal of my dreams. Second to that, it always gets my goat a little that a box of pasta with a dozen servings costs $1.00 at the grocery store, but a meal for one at the restaurant costs nearly $20. Talk about a cash cow for the restaurant.

The above being what it is, there are certain types of Italian restaurants that I can make exceptions for. Growing up, we spent countless nights at Paradise Pizza in Verplanck, NY; an unremarkable looking restaurant that holds some of my dearest memories, as well as the recipe for the world’s best pizza. Having been in Stamford for many years now, I have received the recommendation of Pellicci’s enough times to be led to believe that it had the potential to be something similar.

Pellicci’s has been operating in Stamford since 1947 in a neighborhood that I wouldn’t normally find myself hanging out in after dark, but for its reputation and the hopes of a local diamond in the literal rough, I just had to check it out. The restaurant exterior is nothing to write home about; an older house with the restaurant downstairs. Their parking is valet only, so we risked it and parked on the street.

Walking in, there’s a dining room reminiscent of my Great Grandmother’s house, as well as a room with a dark mahogany bar. To be fair, the room with the bar looked cooler, but when the waitress ushered us into the dining room, which was otherwise filled with people in their 70’s, we didn’t protest. There’s a lot to be said for eating where the elderlies like as they generally have a penchant for good deals and basic, decent meals.


We were seated in the back, by the restrooms in a wooden booth with a comical amount of space between the seats and the table. Let’s just say you could eat countless plates of pasta and somehow still fit into their booths. The waitress was very nice and in her fifties, memorizing our orders without writing them down. The menus were exactly like you’d expect – dated, simple and that of a no frills Italian restaurant operating for 70 years plus.


Settling in on prosecco as my drink of choice, I was as excited as I always am for the bread to arrive. A nice touch is that they offer you both oil and butter depending on your preference to wash down your bread with and it was good stuff. 


Going with the most obvious choice, I ended up deciding on chicken parmesan with salad on the side. For $20, you can have an entrée and a salad OR a vegetable OR pasta but not more than one option. Thinking that this was a bit frugal, I was expecting some superior chicken parm to be sure.


The salad was very good. It was a decent portion size to be sure. To continue my evaluation, I went with their house dressing – something between a vinaigrette and a creamy Italian. The flavor was good, but the consistency was surprisingly watery. There was no amount of dressing that seemed to coat the salad strangely.

At this point I was still optimistic. Nobody goes to an Italian restaurant for salad, so on to the main event. When my chicken parmesan came, I was surprised by the lack of cheese. You can see there are two big cutlets, and one small one. The second big piece was layered under the first, so it was a really missed opportunity to eat more cheese. 


The sauce, which looks abundant in the picture was really inadequate for the entire meal. I would have asked the waitress for more sauce, but she never came back after delivering the meal. The last nail in that coffin was that the chicken came out at room temperature. Usually chicken parm is broiled last minute to heat the cheese, so I was a little put off by when that must have been made. Overall, it was really a disappointing meal in light of my high hopes.

The restaurant space is cool, particularly for its history. Based on the neighborhood and the fact the meal wasn’t inexpensive, I wouldn’t rush back. That said, I am particularly curious about their pizza, so you never know. There must be something that’s been keeping this place open and operating for the past 72 years.

Pellicci's
96 Stillwater Ave, Stamford, CT 06902

Monday, May 20, 2019

Frank about Pepe's

1925 was a big year from the sounds of it. The first motel in America was opened, The Great Gatsby was published and Frank Pepe invented New Haven-style thin crust pizza. As the story goes, the pizza was originally fired over coke, which is a byproduct of coal used extensively until the late 1960’s when it became unavailable. Ever since that time, Pepe’s people have been cooking the pizza in an oven, over coals with long pizza boards to remove one pizza at a time from the fire.


Ever since I started working at my current employer, a handful of folks have been telling me that I have to get up there and try Connecticut’s most raved about pie. After being cautioned frequently regarding the expected wait and being familiar myself with the ungodly traffic that one must suffer through to drive north on I-95 from Stamford, I’ve put this particular journey off. The thinking was, this pizza has been around since 1925 – what’s the rush in getting up there? That said, it was amazing to me how many people that I have encountered when travelling or drinking at a Financial Information Networking Event who would ask me if I have ever had this pizza. I was starting to worry that if I didn’t eventually give this a try, then Governor Ed Lamont was going to knock on my door and take away my residency personally.

A few things happened at the same time that finally made me bite the bullet and visit. The most motivating perhaps being that it’s recently become a pretty serious discussion that I may move out of Connecticut in the mid to near term future. The second thing being that I was lucky enough to receive a generous Pizza Gift Card for my three year dating anniversary. On an evening in May, after waiting for traffic to dissipate as much as anyone could expect on a Friday, we hopped in the car for our hour plus journey for CT’s crown jewel pizza.


Now I’ve never been to Wooster street, so it was super cool to see “New Haven’s Little Italy” and I would be tempted to try any restaurant on that block. Arrival time was around 9:15 PM and I was surprised to find there was still a bit of a wait. We were the first people in the waiting room, but had very little instruction to how this all worked. As we stood there waiting, many people continued to file in. The restaurant closed at 10, so I was surprised to see that it was still filling up at that time of night. When they call the tables, it’s based on the honor system without any line to be formed in the space so I could imagine that could be unpleasant with a pushy enough crowd.

The interior of the restaurant really makes for a cool experience. The décor is old school with wooden panels, lamps from another era and no frill booths with numbers above them to let the staff know exactly where to bring what. The service we experienced was nice, but we did see one woman yelling at anyone who came in beyond the waiting room. If we hadn’t bumped into staff walking into the first door, we would have committed the same offense looking for a hostess. It’s obvious that people want this pizza so badly, that the staff can be however they want and the people will still pour in.


Our order was simple. From their website, any Yelp review, my coworkers, etc it was obvious we’d have to try the white clam pizza. This pie is made with fresh shucked clams, garlic, olive oil and grated cheese on a “charcoal colored crust.” Normally, the BF and I would not be ordering any clams but figuring that we may never be back at the original Frank Pepe’s, we went ahead and ordered this as a small pie. To round out our order, we got a medium original tomato pie with mozzarella to be sure we could fill our starving bellies so late at night.

The restaurant has beer and wine, but I stuck with a diet Coke while my dining companion tried the Foxon Park Soda, which was marketed as being served at the restaurant since the beginning. The verdict on the specialty soda was that it tasted like a sweeter version of Coke. The bottle label design was cool and the notion of trying something new, even cooler.


We didn’t have to wait long after placing our order for our pies to arrive. First the plain cheese came out and I was impressed at how the pizza was cut into so many small slices. Realistically, this medium pie for $14.50 would have been enough for us both to have a full dinner. As we dug in, we both burned the roof of our mouths so badly on the hot oil, that I am writing this blog review 3 days later and it’s still hurting. The website explains that these pizzas are cooked one at a time to ensure that they reach the high heat quickly without compromising it at a lower temperature as one would if they placed too many pies in the oven at once.


The pizza was interesting. It should be mentioned that my boyfriend thought it was really good; perhaps not the best pie or worth all of the hassle but on the notably superior side. Full disclaimer, their sauce hit the same flavor note in my memory of a time I had pizza at a Disney World food court and spent 2 days puking my brains out, missing out on the parks. Try as I might, I couldn’t really get far past that to enjoy it extensively.

I truly enjoyed how much cheese they put on the pizza and the crust did taste like coal, which is also good. We live right outside of a Fortina and their pizza is so much more accessible and tastier that I wasn’t in anyway blown away by this pizza. That said, the experience of sitting in a place with that much history and demand was very cool. Also, it was astounding how much takeout business they were doing during our time inside. If there isn’t already, business school students should do case studies on Frank Pepe’s success.


After having a few plain slices, our white clam pizza came out and it was a welcome break from the original pie. What first surprised me was that there wasn’t really any cream sauce and it was more like a garlic bread with large hunks of clams. I was really encouraged by seeing a sign that explained that if they’re out of fresh clams, you can’t get the pie. A lot of places use canned clams and that’s about as disgusting as it sounds. The pie was lighter than I expected and it helped a lot to take a bite of one pie and then the other. Without the pungent tomato sauce, you could taste the grated cheese covered crust of this pie much more clearly.

Overall, this won’t replace my go-to pizza spot but it was super cool to see a place so notably a part of Connecticut’s Foodie history. Frank Pepe’s has several other locations and if I ever walked by one without a line, I might go in and try pepperoni pizza or something of a similar nature.

For now, when everyone asks me if I live in Connecticut and then if I’ve been to Frank Pepe’s, I can finally feel like a resident around here.

Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana
157 Wooster St, New Haven, CT 06511
https://pepespizzeria.com/new-haven/

Tuesday, April 30, 2019

On the Road: Iggy’s Doughboys - Narragansett, Rhode Island


I have an acute obsession with exploring shore towns during their off season. With my aversion to crowded spaces, loud noises and humans – being at the beach in the swing months is really something I enjoy beyond measure. Last weekend, to celebrate our third year of dating – the boyfriend and I traveled up to Narragansett, Rhode Island to see what it was all about. We’re habitual about this April trip and often find ourselves in popular summer destinations before the bulk of businesses have re-opened. This visit was little exception.

Before we even hit the open road, I am planning what we are going to eat. Key words such as “brewery”, “ice cream” and “seafood” hit my browser before the hotel reservation is booked. And my travel partner in crime? HUGE donut guy. Lucky for him, it’s hard to search too far into Narragansett without reading reviews of Iggy’s. Described as a Doughboy & Chowder House, their website touts celebrating 30 years of existence, being featured on several news/media outlets, as well as actually selling their doughboy mix to make your very own versions of their specialties at home.

Normally a website with so many accolades and marketing banners would turn us off as a “tourist” trap, but head to a town where 70% of stores are closed and you’ll reconsider. On a morning walk, we walked right past one of their locations and while as you can see – it looked gorgeous in its new architecture, it also looked completely closed for the season still.


I loved Narragansett. The weather was crazy and we had an adventure getting to and from Block Island, but this place was really up there for me. I’m still mystified how one town can have so much shoreline and water views everywhere you turn. I’m not sure that I’ll ever get back there, but I hope that I do. After surviving a puke-filled ferry (not us), questionable lobster, and miles of walking in the whipping wind, we got back to the mainland, called Iggy’s and rejoiced in the delight of hearing that they were in fact opened for the afternoon.


Rolling up, we were in awe at the setup for the massive operation. It was pretty empty for our visit, but there was clear infrastructure there to handle the masses with ample seats and places for the line to form. Being April, the only way to order was at the takeout window, although the restaurant allowed you to snag a seat inside after pickup. The interior was well appointed, with a rolling fire in their fireplace. Hours and hours of being in the cold wind and fried dough near a fireplace was just what the doctor ordered.

As a note, the doughboys can be ordered as a ½ dozen or full dozen. Toppings are either plain, granulated sugar, sugar & cinnamon or powdered sugar. A ½ dozen with powdered sugar were $5.49 and not being sure if we’d have another dessert later in the day, we went with that. It probably took about 10 minutes after the order to get them, so it was very encouraging that they were being freshly fried.


What shocked me the most was how large each doughboy was and how heavy in weight. We were initially apprehensive that 6 wouldn’t be enough but I had to actually force feed myself to get the majority of a second one down. This place is great because they give you the powdered sugar in a container to allow you to decide how much additional sugar you prefer.

Taking a bite when they first arrived, they were hot, fresh and delicious, but without the powdered sugar they weren’t too remarkable. Dumping powdered sugar into a paper bag and shaking these things was not for the faint of heart, so be prepared to get messy. Once you add the topping, you’re in for a good time. The hot oil soaks that sugar right up and the flavor is amazing.


The edges are crispy, but the middle is doughy and the only improvement I could even dream to suggest would be an option to add a scoop of ice cream. I’m guessing it’s not cost effective for them, but it would have been great to be able to order a variety of the toppings, or even just one doughboy by piece, since they didn’t seem like they’d save well and we only were able to eat less than 4 without having to toss the rest regrettably.


Reading Yelp before we went, I am surprised how many critical reviews there were for this place. The building was gorgeous, the doughboys were freshly fried and the value was excellent. That said, I didn’t have to wait more than the time it took them to prepare my order so I can only guess what kind of hell that might be if I waited in a long line prior. The only regret that I have from the occasion is not trying their famous chowder, but there’s always the off season of 2020 for that.

Iggy's Doughboys & Chowder House
1151 Point Judith Rd.
Narraganett, RI 02882

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Stamford Restaurant Chronicles: Lorca Coffee Bar


So it seems that I have had the pleasure of surviving another winter here in Connecticut. It’s been a mild one, but still filled with all of the things that keep you on your couch ordering dinner delivery from GrubHub rather than exploring downtown.

To save money, calories and forced coworker socialization, I go to the gym during my lunch break nearly religiously. There’s really nothing about my routine that I vary, but I love just zoning out, blasting music and getting my body moving prior to the final 4-hour push in the cubicle. On this particular day in April, the sun was shining and the birds were chirping in a way you’d only notice at the end of winter. By May, it would already be something you would take for granted – the past winter a terrorist who had faded in your mind.

On a whim, my coworker – an artisanal coffee enthusiast asked me if I wanted to go for a walk and I figured “routine be damned”. I’m hoping for at least a good 80 years on this planet and I can’t imagine that I will get too many like this one. He’d mentioned to me the coffee at Lorca a few times, so it made sense to make that the destination to finally see what it was all about.

Truth be told, four years of culinary classes as a part of my undergrad degree yet somehow, I am a K-Cup, Keurig girl. Unless it’s a latte, I prefer the mildness of Dunkin’ rather than Starbucks and I equate it to a cigar smoking virgin lighting up their first one, a Cuban. Caffeine is continually flowing through my veins, but it’s always that mild and cheap shit. My mind was open and over to Lorca we went.


Walking into the place, I was blown away by how small it was. There are a few tables inside and just two outside but there was a tremendous amount of staff behind the counter. I am on a huge Matcha Latte kick lately and for those of you who don’t know, it’s matcha powder mixed with hot water to create a green tea, combined with steamed (almond – for me) milk.


Lorca only serves up one size drinks and as a fan of a XXL if I can get it, I was a little bit bummed. The staff was the cool hipster types that met my expectations and the latte art was as good looking as a girl can hope for. The real entertainment was watching the baristas make the pour over coffee, which people were ordering up faster than they could make. I’ve never had this, but it was explained to me that there are many ways in the process to change the strength and taste of the coffee so someday when I am hungover maybe. As a note, they have a second location in Cos Cob and a small menu of lunch selections, which I did not try.

I really wanted to love this place, but the latte was the sweetest matcha latte that I have ever had. My first sip was at the point of being unpleasant, as somebody who doesn’t drink any sweetened drinks when it can be avoided. If I wanted a hot and drinkable dessert and I couldn’t find a hot chocolate, I would order this. That said, I suspect they just use a really sweet almond milk and that other orders may be better. My accomplice in this Lorca mission got an alfajor cookie and even though he really likes Lorca, he said “Probably not worth the sugar”.


I love being outside, trying somewhere new and caffeine so I enjoyed all of this. That being said, I am going to go and make myself a K-Cup.

Lorca Coffee Bar
125 Bedford St, Stamford, CT 06901
http://www.lorcacoffeebar.com/

Monday, February 25, 2019

Review: Leslie's Peanut Patties



A month ago, I was sitting at home and received a text from my sister telling me that she was in Texas and eating a candy that she figured that I wouldn’t like and would I want her to bring me home one. We long ago have established the kind of honesty about the quality of food where one of us bites the restaurant bread from the basket placed on the table and lets the other one know with brutal honesty if the carbs are “worth it”. Not doubting her assessment, but facing the reality that I wasn’t likely going to find myself in Texas in the immediate future, I asked her to bring me back the confectionary anyway.


As it turns out, the offer was for Leslie’s Peanut Pattie. The ingredients list, listed in order of volume is sugar, corn syrup, peanuts, red food coloring and artificial flavor. This candy was really a sight to behold with its vibrant red color and general heft, which could only be the corn syrup.


This candy amazed me to look at and handle, in the way abstract art might strike somebody. I love candy and eat candy all of the time, but I have never ever seen anything even kind of like this.


To be fair, peanuts are generally a real miss for me. While I love peanut butter, I pay extra in all of my snack nut mixes to skip the peanuts. Also, I generally avoid food dye when it’s blaringly obvious, with the exception of anything M&M’s or Reese’s Pieces, so I was excited to have an excuse to get out of my uptight nutritional box.


Boy was this different than my expectations. I thought that this would be extremely sweet and then cut by the presence of the salty peanuts but boy was I wrong. For me, the confectionary where peanuts were not present reminded me more of the taste of wax lips. The texture was crumbly as dried sugar would be, but in the absence of the peanuts being evenly dispersed it was really something different. The peanuts were not salty so they added more in texture than in additional flavor.

Their website says that they have been making these since 1949, so I suspect that there are people out there who truly enjoy this combination. While this candy was fun to try, I have to say that once again, my sister was right. I’m not sure what I expected sugar + food dye + peanuts to taste like, but now I am happy to know. Thank you, Sis!

www.lesliecandyco.com


Thursday, February 21, 2019

Stamford Restaurant Chronicles: Hudson Social CT

Two years ago, I was lucky enough to participate in an international training program at my company, which involved three trips to Switzerland during the duration, meaning that it was a good way to try a bunch of different foods and to meet a handful of cool people. Now fast forward to a couple of months ago, my friend Dario from this program reached out to let us know that he was planning a visit to NYC and would be on our side of the pond. After experiencing an incredible amount of hospitality during my travels, it only made sense that it was time to return the favor.



The best part about the entire ordeal? When I asked him what kind of cuisine he would prefer, he told me 1. American, because we were in America and 2. Somewhere that I haven’t been so it could be a blog post. Now this made my whole day. I am pretty sure there are about 3 the readers of this blog, most of whom either are related to me or date me, but if even one reader is in Switzerland then this blog in INTERNATIONAL! Too delightful.

Since I generally go out to eat more often than I cook, it was sheer luck that Hudson Grille on Bedford Street had recently changed hands and rebranded to Hudson Social and DOUBLE luck that it was also Restaurant Week. As learned that evening, Switzerland does not have a “Restaurant Week”, so it’s a real marvel that you can get 3 courses for $28. If you don’t overeat in America, were you even here?

The last point to mention here before I get into the meat of the review is that I generally avoid eating places that become rowdy bars at night. I’ve spent many, many nights enjoying copious amounts of Bud Lights on the dance floor of Hudson, so I was apprehensive that the restaurant would smell too much like stale beer and puke for my esteemed colleague - but read on to find out why this was not the case at all.



After a brief office visit, Dario in addition to a few other colleagues and I headed to dinner at Hudson Social around 5:30PM EST. I was able to make a reservation on Open Table, thinking restaurant week might beef up the attendance, but we were the only seated table in the place. The restaurant still had a great ambiance and service was attentive and alas, no signs of a rowdy previous Saturday night to be seen or smelled.



Their cocktail list was what you’d expect and it was even $1 off each drink for RW, but I went ahead and got a mimosa because it’s cold and flu season. Half Full Lager was on draft, so Dario was able to take a sip of our local beer offerings on his visit as well. In reviewing the Restaurant Week menu, I was really blown away by the options for $28. There are also restaurants doing the same, but for $38 and this seemed like it couldn’t be beat. All 4 of us decided to utilize restaurant week and I don’t believe anybody was sorry.



My appetizer order was the avocado and burrata toast and let me tell you, this was the absolute star of the show. I could have had an additional slice of this and left the happiest camper that you’ve ever seen. Basic or not, I eat a ton of avocados and this toast was superior to most. The toast was topped with marinated tomatoes, balsamic, pistachios and a burrata that made you beg for more. This appetizer was smaller than some of the others that came out to our table, but I would go back just for this on any given Sunday morning given the chance.


Moving on to my main course, I decided on the pan roasted branzino, which came with roasted fennel, tabbouleh, orange segments and gremolata. Now I had already read reviews on Yelp, so I wasn’t too shocked by how incredibly small and thin the fish was – but there was barely any tabbouleh and absolutely no orange slices to be found. I don’t like fruit, so I wasn’t disappointed but I also don’t generally eat fish skin but was forced to just because I was afraid I would otherwise be leaving the dinner quite hungry. The picture here looks big, but it is an illusion. It’s probably a lot to ask for fresh fish at such a low price, but the fish was truly very dry and fried being so thin. I would not order this again here, Restaurant week or otherwise.




Following that fish fiasco, the brownie sundae was delivered and all negative memories of the entrée were erased from my mind. The brownie was soft in the center and the ice cream was cool and creamy. Lately most desserts have been a real letdown at restaurants for whatever reason, but this brownie sundae was decent.

The owner came over twice to check on things and seemed really eager to ensure that we all had a good time, which I absolutely did. As we were leaving, the place was really filling up for dinner on a Tuesday night I am hopeful that this guy will have a lot of success in the location. Overall it seems restaurant week was the best way to get to know this restaurant to be clear on what’s good to order at brunch and what’s better to skip. If being social is your focus, this place is the spot.

Hudson Social CT
128 Bedford St, Stamford, CT 06901


Wednesday, February 6, 2019

Review: "The Most Stuff"ed Oreos

As a person who is consistent in only eating the frosting layer of cakes and saving the tops of cupcakes for last, you can imagine my delight when I heard that Nabisco was coming out with their “Most Stuffed” version of the classic cookie. When I was a mere tot, I would twist the Oreo cookies apart and push the crème sides of two cookies together, discarding the plain wafers, maintaining the notion that one good cookie beats out two mediocre cookies any day.

On an errand run, while we were adulting so hard, the clouds of responsibility parted and the sun shined down on our cart in Walmart as my boyfriend pulled the blue familiar package off of the display shelf for us to purchase. Not lost from sight in the sea of paper towels, tissues and cold medicine, we instantly had something to look forward to. A store filled with an abundance of degenerates with no space to push your shopping cart? No problem. From that moment on, life was going to be okay. Sugar and its healing effects, I’ll tell you.


Looking at the packaging, the only real difference here is the graphic and the promise that it will never get any better than this. I’ve never really been a huge fan of their “convenient” pull down opening as it never seals quite right, but that only matters if your cookies are going to hang around for a particularly long time.


In opening the package up, it was clear that there are a lot less cookies on offer here. Each row seems to have an abundance of unfilled space, as though some cookies simply disappeared from the packaging. At the 110 calories PER cookie and 22% of daily sugar allotment for just one, maybe the disappearing cookies were for our own benefit.


These cookies are simply amazing. You bite into them and the crème filling just oozes out. The wafers are harder than they normally are, but they have a big job to do here. You don’t build Hoover Dam with veneer. 


The proportion is perfect and the only thing I am left wanting for is a lower calorie count. As you eat these cookies, the frosting oozes out of the other side, so I imagine these cookies wouldn’t be great to eat in the car, etc.


Unless you’re the kind of person who tells everyone that Biscotti is your favorite cookie, get out and try these amazing limited time dreams come true. Your inner 8 year old will thank you.

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Review: Lay's New England Lobster Roll Potato Chips

Old friends are good for so many things; they can pick you up at the airport, be a shoulder to cry on or even give you some tough love when you’re busy feeling a little too sorry for yourself. Some embroidered pillows even propose the notion that “Friends are the chocolate chips of life”, but somehow, I have it one better than that. Since starting my food blog a few years ago, I have been blessed with a few thoughtful folks picking up truly interesting snacks for me to try. Well lightening has struck once again and a few months ago, my friend Scott who was mainly working out of Boston at the time told me that he snagged me a bag of Lay's New England Lobster Roll Potato Chips.

A few years ago, I made the interesting decision to move one hour Northeast of where I used to live to Connecticut for work. And no, that doesn’t sound like a big move but it’s a little bit colder with a bit more traffic and a ton more Patriot fans to deal with. The only payout of moving out of the Mid-Atlantic and into New England is the more accessible lobster roll, which people of Connecticut are wildly obsessed with. Being candid, I am not immune to the aforementioned obsession myself. In hearing that Lay's would venture into this space, I couldn’t contain my excitement!


For the sake of being authentic in my review, with my friend traveling and a few other life commitments taking up some time, it wasn’t until months later that I actually got my hands on the bag of the chips in question. Before opening, I noticed that they were more than a month expired, but if you think that the thought of an expired large crustacean was going to be enough for me not to eat these, then I am positive that we’ve never met.

In the past year, Lay's went on a campaign to pay tribute to regional flavors across America and the Lobster Roll flavored chips were originally released at the Maine Lobster Festival, making me think of a room where there were thousands of people wearing flannel with discerning palettes to whom the chips would have had to hold up their flavor for. The chips are described by the company as having the “flavor of fresh lobster served on a buttery grilled roll”.


The verdict? These chips rocked. I would argue that they are predominantly sour cream and onion flavored, but reading the ingredients it’s not hard to see why - having both sour cream and onion powder as a part of the recipe. Lobster roll seasoning, rather than actual lobster is where the chips derive their flavor from, so it’s not hard to tell why this particular flavor is a bit absent. It should be said that if I had made it a point to snag these chips before they expired, perhaps they would have been a bit fishier, but I can’t say that I would have enjoyed that any more than I did.


Just because these chips don’t taste quite like biting into heaps and heaps of lobster, isn’t to say that they aren’t delicious. These thick cut chips could be enjoyed by nearly anyone, independent of their obsession for the Maine based sandwich.


Between the creaminess of the sour cream and the taste of butter and onion, these are chips that will always be welcome to my party. Be warned, they are highly addictive. Cheers to good friends and great chips.